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  • 88,000-Year-Old Finger Bone Pushes Back Human Migration Dates

    88,000-Year-Old Finger Bone Pushes Back Human Migration Dates

    via National Geographic: More than 85,000 years ago, the Arabian peninsula looked very different from the vast, sandy expanse people see today. The region was a lush grassland, seasonally greening with every rainy period, and dotted by hundreds of freshwater lakes. Researchers have found evidence in the sands of aquatic- and semi-aquatic mammals, such as hippos, which are more commonly associated with the African subcontinent. They’ve also found stone tools the suggest an early human presence […]

  • Archaeologists Unearth 115,000-Year-Old Bone Tools in China

    Archaeologists Unearth 115,000-Year-Old Bone Tools in China

    via Sci News: An international team of researchers led by Université de Montréal’s Dr. Luc Doyon has found seven bone soft hammers at the early hominin Lingjing site in Xuchang county of Henan province, China. These 115,000-year-old tools represent the first instance of the use of bone as raw material to modify stone tools found at an East Asian early Late Pleistocene site. The seven bone tools analyzed by Dr. Doyon and co-authors were excavated between […]

  • Tiny Statue Revealed in China’s Yungang Grottoes

    Tiny Statue Revealed in China’s Yungang Grottoes

    via Archaeology: TAIYUAN, CHINA—Xinhua reports that a small, 1,500-year-old statue has been found in a small hole in one of the caves of the Yungang Grottoes. Wang Yanqing of the Yungang Grottoes Research Institute was conducting a survey of the Buddhist temples built in the fifth and sixth centuries into 53 major caves, and more than 50,000 niches, when he found the eroded statue. Measuring about six inches tall, the figure has wide shoulders, a muscular […]

  • Discovery of Windsor Neolithic Monument Excites Archaeologists

    Discovery of Windsor Neolithic Monument Excites Archaeologists

    via The Guardian: A Neolithic monument has been discovered less than two miles from Windsor Castle. Dating from 5,500 years ago, it is one of the earliest known examples of monument-building in Britain. A ceremonial gathering place known as a causewayed enclosure has been revealed with the discovery of a series of encircling ditches, artificial boundaries with gap entrances, at a vast site in Berkshire. Archaeologists have found extensive quantities of animal bones as well as […]

  • Is Space the Next Frontier for Archaeology?

    Is Space the Next Frontier for Archaeology?

    via ars Technica: In the past 60 years, humans have left a lot of stuff on other worlds or floating in space. We’ve landed (or crashed) spacecraft on Mercury, Venus, the Moon, Mars, Comet 67P/Churyumov–Gerasimenko, and Titan. Along with the hundreds of objects in orbit around Earth, the Moon, and Mars, those spacecraft provide a physical record of human activity that could outlast some of the most ancient ruins here on Earth. “There’s stuff in orbit, […]

  • China’s Top Archaeological Finds of 2017 Announced

    China’s Top Archaeological Finds of 2017 Announced

    via gdtimes : Archaeological findings that contain the most valuable information on human activity were unveiled and ranked at the 2017 Archaeology Forum held by the China Academy of Social Sciences (CASS) in Beijing on Tuesday. The event was jointly organised by the CASS Institute of Archaeology and its Archaeology magazine, reports Chinese news portal People. A Palaeolithic site discovered in the Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region—the Tongtiandong site—was proclaimed the year’s greatest discovery. It is a […]

  • German Archaeologists Find Collection of Ancient Clay Seals in Turkey

    German Archaeologists Find Collection of Ancient Clay Seals in Turkey

    via Sci News : Archaeologists from the University of Münster, Germany, have unearthed a large collection of 1,800-year-old clay seals, or bullae, at the ancient city of Doliche, which was part of the province of Syria in Roman times. “This unique group of over 1,000 artifacts from the municipal archive of Doliche (modern-day Dülük, Turkey) gives many insights into the local Greco-Roman pantheon — from Zeus to Hera to the soldier god Jupiter Dolichenus, who turned […]

  • Archaeologists Discover Three Roman Shipwrecks

    Archaeologists Discover Three Roman Shipwrecks

    via HERITAGEDAILY : ARCHAEOLOGISTS IN EGYPT HAVE ANNOUNCED THE DISCOVERY OF THREE UNDERWATER SHIPWRECKS THAT DATE FROM THE ROMAN ERA IN ABU QIR BAY, ALEXANDRIA. The three wrecks were uncovered during a research project in collaboration between the European Institute of Underwater Archaeology and the Supreme Council of Antiquities. In a press statement, Dr. Mostafa Waziri added that the project also uncovered a Roman head carved in crystal that may belong to the commander of the […]

  • Photo credit: Ancient Origin

    2,400-Year-Old Horse and Chariot Pit Unearthed in China

    via Xinhuanet : ZHENGZHOU, Nov. 1 (Xinhua) — Archaeologists in central China’s Henan Province have excavated a 2,400-year-old pit containing horses and chariots beside a tomb possibly belonging to a lord. The No. 3 Horse and Chariot Pit is one of a cluster of tombs belonging to noble families of the Zheng State, a vassal state during the Spring and Autumn (770-476 B.C) and Warring States periods (475-221 B.C), near the city of Xinzheng. Since February, […]

  • Archaeology Fossil Teeth Discovery in Germany Could Re-Write Human History

    Archaeology Fossil Teeth Discovery in Germany Could Re-Write Human History

    via DW : A 9.7-million-year-old discovery has left a team of German scientists scratching their heads. The teeth seem to belong to a species only known to have appeared in Africa several million years later. A team of German archaeologists discovered a puzzling set of teeth in the former riverbed of the Rhine, the Museum of Natural History in Mainz announced on Wednesday. The teeth don’t appear to belong to any species discovered in Europe or […]