Home / General Knowledge / Science

 
  • Memory Depends On Protein ‘Off-Switch’

    via ScienceDaily: This new knowledge could enable us to better understand and combat neurological diseases which inhibit memory, such as Alzheimer’s. Dr Mark Wall from Warwick’s School of Life Sciences, with researchers from the University of Bradford and Georgia State University, have found that the Arc protein — which increases in the brain during learning — needs to be rapidly switched off and removed shortly after we have received new information, in order for us to […]

  • Cell Nucleus Size Could Determine How Long You Are Going To Live, Say Scientists

    Cell Nucleus Size Could Determine How Long You Are Going To Live, Say Scientists

    via INDEPENDENT: Once there was a mutant worm in an experiment. It lived for 46 days. This was much longer than the oldest normal worm, which lived just 22. Researchers identified the mutated gene that had lengthened the worm’s life, which led to a breakthrough in the study of ageing – it seemed to be controlled by metabolic processes. Later, as researchers studied these processes, all signs seemed to point to the nucleolus. Under a microscope, […]

  • How The Power Of Mathematics Can Help Assess Lung Function

    How The Power Of Mathematics Can Help Assess Lung Function

    via ScienceDaily: Researchers at the University of Southampton have developed a new computational way of analysing X-ray images of lungs, which could herald a breakthrough in the diagnosis and assessment of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) and other lung diseases. A multi-disciplinary team of mathematicians, clinicians, and image specialists from three University of Southampton faculties has devised a method for numerically describing the complicated three-dimensional structure of the lung using topology — a part of mathematics […]

  • New Research Offers Clues On How To Improve Memory During Sleep

    New Research Offers Clues On How To Improve Memory During Sleep

    Forbes: When it comes to remembering, brain-wave patterns during deep—or slow-wave—sleep could play a critical role, according to a new study by University of Alberta neuroscientists. “During slow-wave activity, brain cells fire in all sorts of patterns, which we think represents the strengthening of memories during sleep,” explained Anastasia Greenberg, who led the research while completing her PhD with Clay Dickson, a professor in the Department of Psychology. In the study, researchers simulated slow-wave sleep in […]

  • How One Cell Gives Rise To An Entire Body

    How One Cell Gives Rise To An Entire Body

    via Science: One of biology’s great mysteries is how a single fertilized egg gives rise to the multitude of cell types, tissues, and organs that fit together to make a body. Now, a combination of single-cell sequencing technologies and computational tools is providing the most detailed picture yet of this process. In three papers online in Science this week, researchers report taking multiple snapshots of gene activity in most of the cells in developing zebrafish or […]

  • Chemists Orchestrate The Molecular Union of Two Single Atoms

    Chemists Orchestrate The Molecular Union of Two Single Atoms

    via Wired: THE MAIN ACT of Kang-Kuen Ni’s experiment could fit on the tip of a needle—and it happens in a fraction of a second. The Harvard chemist takes two individual atoms, a sodium and a cesium, each about 10,000 times smaller than a bacterium. Then, very carefully, she brings them together to become a single molecule: sodium cesium. It’s an unlikely pairing. In the cosmic rom-com that is nature, sodium rarely goes for cesium; both […]

  • Life 2.0: Inside The Synthetic Biology Revolution

    Life 2.0: Inside The Synthetic Biology Revolution

    via Cosmos: Imagine a future where synthetic jellyfish roam waterways looking for toxins to destroy, where eco-friendly plastics and fuels are harvested from vats of yeast, where viruses are programmed to be cancer killers, and electronic gadgets repair themselves like living organisms. Welcome to the world of synthetic biology, or ‘synbio’, where possibilities are limited only by the imagination. Its practitioners don’t view life as a mystery but as a machine – one that can […]

  • Global Warming Is Messing Up Nature’s Dinner Time, Study Says

    Global Warming Is Messing Up Nature’s Dinner Time, Study Says

    via CBS News: WASHINGTON — Global warming is screwing up nature’s intricately timed dinner hour, often making hungry critters and those on the menu show up at much different times, a new study shows. Timing is everything in nature. Bees have to be around and flowers have to bloom at the same time for pollination to work, and hawks need to migrate at the same time as their prey. In many cases, global warming is interfering […]

  • Scientists Discover First Super Salty Subglacial Lakes in Canadian Arctic

    Scientists Discover First Super Salty Subglacial Lakes in Canadian Arctic

    via ScienceDaily: An analysis of radar data led scientists to an unexpected discovery of two lakes located beneath 550 to 750 metres of ice underneath the Devon Ice Cap, one of the largest ice caps in the Canadian Arctic. They are thought to be the first isolated hypersaline subglacial lakes in the world. “We weren’t looking for subglacial lakes. The ice is frozen to the ground underneath that part of the Devon Ice Cap, so we […]

  • Why Your Knuckles Make That Satisfying Cracking Sound, According to Science

    Why Your Knuckles Make That Satisfying Cracking Sound, According to Science

    via mentalfloss: Scientific curiosity is not always burdened by matters of great consequence. Over the years, considerable money and time has been applied to matters involving facial recognition between sheep, whether the flow of urine is impeded by someone watching you pee, and whether humans can capably swim in a pool full of syrup. (They can, almost as well as water.) Now, researchers from Stanford University and Ecole Polytechnique in France have turned the roving eye […]