Recent Posts (Page 87)

  • NEW YORK - JUNE 23: For FEATURES: Kid Entrepreneur, Lyla Black at home in Queens with her monster toys.(photo by Tamara Beckwith)

    This 8-year-old entrepreneur is more successful than grown businessmen

    Via New York Post : One of Queens’ most promising young businesswomen is contemplating what she’ll buy if her business becomes a megahit. Her eyes suddenly light up. “A new sister and brother!” Lyla Black shouts. If that sounds childish, it’s because Black is, in fact, a kid. At age 8, her line of stuffed animals, Lyla Tov Monsters, is a success. She won the Young Inventor award at the Toy & Game Inventor of the […]

  • Queen opens new Strathclyde University technology centre

    Queen opens new Strathclyde University technology centre

    Via BBC : The Queen has opened an £89m technology and innovation centre in Glasgow. But what lies behind its walls? It tackles the mysteries of atoms, plasma, lasers, bio-nano-micrology and even street-lighting. On one floor, chemists are working on the rapid turnaround of blood tests, using impossibly small particles, leading to rapid diagnoses. On another, they’re drawing together vast amounts of data for the intelligent lamppost of the future. This is a striking, triangular building […]

  • Research students must be trained for jobs in industry

    Research students must be trained for jobs in industry

    Via AFR Weekend : Globalisation is leading to an increasingly interconnected world and innovation is the key to remaining competitive. Most of us rely on wireless internet in our day to day lives, but few would be aware that Wi-Fi technology is the product of research at an Australian publicly funded research organisation. Some of Australia’s brightest minds are in our publicly funded universities and it is vital for Australia’s future prosperity that they are better […]

  • Queen’s University team develops superbug destroyer

    Queen’s University team develops superbug destroyer

    Via Belfast Telegraph : A new treatment to protect hospital patients against a lethal superbug could save thousands of lives. Researchers at Queen’s University Belfast have found a new way of tackling Klebsiella, a potentially deadly bug which causes bladder infections and pneumonia. The therapy uses an “inhibitor” molecule to stop the bug blocking a body’s natural defences. Professor José Bengoechea, of the School of Medicine, Dentistry and Biomedical Sciences at Queen’s, said: “This is really […]

  • This teenager has made a gadget to stop Alzheimer’s patients getting lost

    This teenager has made a gadget to stop Alzheimer’s patients getting lost

    Via Science Alert : US high-school student, Kenneth Shinozuka, has developed a low-cost device that alerts family members or nurses when a patient gets out of bed, helping to prevent people with Alzheimer’s from wandering off and getting dangerously lost. Sixteen-year-old Shinozuka was inspired to create the device after his grandfather, who suffers from dementia and Alzheimer’s disease, walked onto a freeway in the middle of a night and was brought home by a police officer. […]

  • Does Music Give You Math Skills?

    Does Music Give You Math Skills?

    Via Live Science : Naomi Eide is a master’s student in the Philip Merrill College of Journalism at the University of Maryland, College Park. She contributed this article to Live Science’s Expert Voices: Op-Ed & Insights. Denny Gulick began playing piano at age 4. With perfect pitch and a knack for memorization, he was a natural. When Gulick was 5, his father gave him math multiplication tables that extended up to 16, and taught him pi […]

  • How does the brain recognize faces from minimal information?

    How does the brain recognize faces from minimal information?

    Via Science Daily : Our brain recognizes objects within milliseconds, even if it only receives rudimentary visual information. Researchers believe that reliable and fast recognition works because the brain is constantly making predictions about objects in the field of view and is comparing these with incoming information. Only if mismatches occur in this process do higher areas of the brain have to be notified of the error in order to make active corrections to the predictions. […]

  • Are high heels bad for your feet?

    Are high heels bad for your feet?

    Via The Guardian : Your ankles, heels and calves can all suffer if you wear high heels a lot. So should you throw away your stilettos – or is there a compromise? I have one pair of high heels, and they hurt. The pain is mostly in my feet because they are forced into an unnaturally extended position with my toes bunched upwards and heel sticking up. My lower back isn’t too happy either. But who […]

  • Why Russian and U.S. mosquitoes are so different

    Why Russian and U.S. mosquitoes are so different

    Via Futurity : When scientists compared the genomes of urban and suburban mosquitoes in Russia and the United States they found a suburban mosquito in the US has more in common with an urban mosquito in the US than it does with a suburban mosquito in Russia. That findings suggest individual populations are likely to have evolved resistance to whatever local selection pressures are typical in their area. Understanding the genomes of those populations could one […]

  • The benefits of a bilingual brain

    Via TedEd : Let’s Begin… It’s obvious that knowing more than one language can make certain things easier — like traveling or watching movies without subtitles. But are there other advantages to having a bilingual (or multilingual) brain? Mia Nacamulli details the three types of bilingual brains and shows how knowing more than one language keeps your brain healthy, complex and actively engaged.